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's a point you made earlier in an earlier segment that the bottom line is the economy is still very, very weak. i'll tell you, we've been on overweight equities for the last six or nine months. we're now starting to pull back some of the risk. yes, the market could rally higher. i don't see the stimulus up as much as i did when everybody didn't believe qe-3 was coming. i think there's more negative potential headlines. we're taking risk off the table right now and hopefully we'll re-enter at a lower position. >> it's interesting. rickntelli, the fiscal cliff keeps coming up. that's one of the biggest issues in terms of keeping businesses from making any real decisions here, putting money to work, and it's also the highlight going into the election. >> it is. i guess the real irony is even if the fiscal cliff didn't exist, the outlook economically, both domestically and globally, is deteriorating. really, it's a bit of a double whammy. i'll go back to what i said the last time we discussed this an hour ago. if you look at the 21 weeks from mid-october to march of 2000 when the nasdaq crash
's not forget we also had a dismal report on durable goods orders, once again showing weakness in this economy. investors not worried about these numbers today. >> we got decent news out of europe and china this morning. either way, we're asking if investors should think twice before buying into this kind of a rally based on what the u.s. economy is telling us right now. let's talk about it in today's "closing bell" exchange. we have larry blazer from mayflower advisers and our own rick santelli and mandy drury. larry glazer, you happen to believe that economically there's an iceberg dead ahead. this market doesn't act like it today. >> no, it doesn't. you can see today investors are so focused on the global stimlouse story that they're missing the big picture. the big picture is the fact that the economic data, particularly global manufacturing data, is absolutely rolling over. look at chinese manufacturing, down 11 months in a row. you hit the nail on the head. gdp, durable goods, all a sign of weakness. the problem is the catalysts are behind us and the icebergs are ahead. you've got the fi
output at a plant as the economy slows and demand weakens. meantime 40% of china's iron ore mines are standing idle as steel prices have crumbled. and loans to firms and households fell more than expected. ecb staying loans to the private sector fell 0.6% from the same month a year ago. italy's borrowing costs falling at a bond auction today. analysts say the auction shows nand for italian government paper remains healthy. and eu regulators are prepare to go charge microsoft for failing to comply with a 2009 ruling. that ruling had on ordered the company to offer user as choice of web browsers. apparently they may not have done that. if guilty, microsoft could face fines of up to 10% of its global revenues. and that would be a lot of money. >> iran still, we're this close to nuclear -- think our unfunded labels are like 60 trillion or something. europe back in the crapper, but the refs. huh? >> i told you, i don't always like unions. i'm actually happy that the refs union won. >> it does provide a release from some of the travails and the worries of every day life. spoorts is spor
, caterpillar, bellweathers for the economy, it sends a weak signal about the economy. sooner or later, gravity will overwhelm the central bank easing. the question is, does it happen before or after the election? >>neil: we live in the moment and i do not dispute what you are saying. but i do say the barometer has been right 90 percent of the time. as the quarter goes before the election, so go the election for or against the incumbent. this are many other barometers that point in a variety different ways so this is one of them. it doesn't necessarily mean anything. i am wondering if what this is saying for president obama is that people are going to look at their financial statements, if they are lucky enough to have accounts and they are up, or they will look at their home values if they are lucky enough to have a home going up in value and they feel, on paper, some of this wealth affect we hear about. you dismiss that? >>guest: well, it is a good point that perhaps what this is telling us is that bernanke at the federal reserve is throwing the kitchen sink at this to stimulate it through th
the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the company would contribute and what role he might be playing after a buyout. and oracle ceo larry ellison says the company won't be making any major acquisitions during the next couple years. in an interview on "closing bell" yesterday, ellison said he is instead focused on growing organically. he also discussed the dividend. >> that's the decision of the oracle board of directors. i believe we'll gradually increase the dividend as opposed to dublg it or tripling it all at once. nothing dramatic. >> shares of oracle during the last year, take a look at it. 31.65. he's gotten close to the top there, joe. >> all righ
with hundreds of billions of dollars and most of the discretionary spending cuts would drive the economy back into recession and cost too many jobs of the other hand would also go a long way to produce budget deficits. even by washington standards that seems pretty important. to discuss the cliff and its consequences of a panel of the four but it did it cover in budget watchers. bob greenstein is on the senate priorities and that of president obama's transition team policy work. douglas holtz-eakin is president of the american action forum and headed the domestic policy staff in the campaign ad was the director of the congressional budget office. donald marron is the director of the tax policy center and member of george bush's advisor and acting director of cbo and finally, digamma rogers blogs as an economist and was the chief economist of the house budget committee for the democratic staff of the house ways and means committee. the format today will be relatively straightforward. each of the panelists will speak for five minutes. i will ask some questions and we will get a discussion going
the fallout of the crisis threatens the u.s. economy on your 401k. amy kellogg joins us from london with more. >> reporter: it affects your 401k was the markets of course are corelated and the markets in europe are down. also the s&p derives a significance portion of its earnings from european then american companies have operations overseas that make money in europe, therefore if the economy here is in a bad way that hurts americans. there was this big strike in greece today that got violent when some black-hooded anarchists kind of took advantage of the situation, throwing gasoline bombs at police. they used a general strike and march as a vehicle to just rage against authority. over 50,000 people came out. they are processing the further cuts that are coming their way . many in greece are generally desperate now having seen their salaries drop by more than 20% already since austerity became a way of life in greece. social safety networks are not able to save people. one person at the demonstration was quoted as saying, we are bleeding, we can't take it any more. the new conservative-led co
are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, all that free cash flow in the corporate sector to be put to more productive use, investing in capital and labor. there's a real need for it, carl, because the capital stock in the economy is basically depreciating. we're operating with old depleted capital. >> housing is a much smaller portion. the context of this is we need a much bigger engine for this economy this time around. >> we do. but partly most of the housing is so low because it came from a high level and then a collapse. if you look at the fed flow of funds data, you've had two record quarters of growth because of higher home prices. but we need more jobs. so housing is helping, the consumer is still holding in. we need more jobs. it's got to come from the business side. >> what gives you the confidence that europe has stabilized? of course, we look at this durable goods number, we know that's partially because of european weakness, but some would s
. pakistani libya putting bounties on american citizens' heads. here at home, the american economy is in shambling. obamanomics turned it to food stamp obama nation. war on jobs is crushing the middle class. as american cities declare bankruptcy for the first time ever. so, go ahead with "the view." go ahead with "letterman show." the clooney dinners. i understand you're eye candy. i understand you have your priorities. unfortunately, your priorities don't line up with ours. >> bob: that was very depressing. >> eric: it is depressing. >> bob: okay. >> eric: it is depressing. the man has time for the view and letterman but can't meet with netanyahu or tackle the major issues going on in america: jobs. >> bob: i would venture to say most presidents up for re-election, general assembly of the u.n. in september of election year don't have a lot of bilateral meetings -- >> dana: if you're going to say that, why don't you check it out first. we have polls who do things like that all day. >> bob: i checked in with -- >> dana: so you can say -- >> eric: we checked with the people in the br
a red flag for the economy. we'll talk more about the transports and what they're telling us at 6:40. we'll also focus on the economy with the man who is charged with officially calling recessions and the end of those recessions. james poterba will be here at 7:30. and our corporate story of the morning, smartphones and mobile devices. apple launches the new iphone 5 in 22 more countries today and this comes after blackberry posted better than expected quarterly results after the bell last night. still, it is an uphill climb for this company. we'll be talking to research in motion ceo. and plus we will welcome today's political news maker, senator rand paul, one of the nation's best known tea party members. and by the way, in case you went to sleep early last night, the official nfl refs were back on the field. get this, they got a standing ovation as they took the field. the ravens beating the browns 23-16. we will have more on the game and on what's happening in sports at 6:20 eastern time. first andrew has the morning's top business headlines. >>> on the global markets agenda, results
're finding things to do on the consumer side. i would tell you, i do think the chinese economy in particular, the export economy, is structurally broken. i think that's a big change. i've been going to china since 1995. i think there's a fundamental shift in what's going on. we saw that in the caterpillar numbers. you saw that in the federal express numbers. some people think that's cyclical. i think there's prob a m secular component to it. >> this is a very important point you're making because china's growth has been driven by the export economy. you're saying that it's in trouble, it's broken. >> i'm not saying it's broken. i'm saying there's a transition going on towards consumption exporting to europe and real estate are no longer going to be their drivers nap will probably create more volatility than we've had in the past. >> how easy is it to expect this transition? you're buying in the consumer space. >> yes, and you have the transition of the government. one of the other big messages we picked up over there, particularly in i understondia, emerging market central banks, they're ver
is stacked to play in romney's favor. the things romney is accusing obama of owe mismanaging the economy, fast and furious, this banghazi stuff -, that can't be rebutted. what obama is accusing romney of, being a tax cheat, swiss bank accounts, all that kind of stuff, can be rebutted. >> sean: what obama will say -- thus this will be mostly on the economy. obama will say, it's getting better. that was the recovery summer of 2010. >> but romney -- there were a whole lot of people right now who want to vote for romney. want to vote against obama. but they don't want to vote for romney because of all the negatives obama's piled on them which has not been answered. they're sitting on one side waiting for permission to jump over and vote for romney. in the debate, that he's not a monster, that he's a man of integrity and defending himself on this stuff, can absolutely encourage them to jump over and make it possible for them to do that. >> sean: what a joke all weekend, watching the obama people trying to lower expectations. >> yeah, right. >> sean: 2-1. >> let's par remember that most debate
of the executive suite and of course the economy and business in america as well as globally. we're going to talk with him at 4:30 p.m. eastern. before that, we have some heavy hitters coming up, including the former yahoo! ceo and the coca-cola ceo. all of a that coming up in the program. meanwhile, let's get back to the markets. we have a double-digit decline. in fact, it looks like the dow is on track to close lower for the sixth time in eight trading sessions. the dow jones industrial average now at 13,436, a decline of about 0.5%. if we close lower today that, would be the sixth decline in the last eight trading sessions. a bit of worry about earnings on the trading horizon, as we are expected expecting the stream of earnings to take effect. weakness in apple today. it is about 5% of the s&p 500 and 20% of the nasdaq. so as apple goes, so goes the market. that's what we're seeing once again today. s&p 500 down about five points. that's 1/3 of 1%. with markets in the red, let's look at what this says about where we are in business today. joining me in today's "closing bell" exchange, we have
. are the fed's actions going to have much impact on the economy, and what about the jobs picture right now? >> okay, first you got to recognize the head winds the fed is working against. economic growth is slowing because of uncertainties surrounding the fiscal cliff. analysts were overoptimistic about earnings, and that reality is sinking in. and the world is a risky place. so there's reasons investors lack conviction. with regard to jobs, we've heard the adp number before. i think it's kind of getting old. so i don't take much from the fact that markets didn't respond to the adp report. i think we'll get a solid number, 125-k. >> historically, still a very small number though, right? >> sure. it's one in which we're not making material progress in reducing unemployment, and it's not one the fed will be satisfied with. they told us they're setting a much higher bar for employment gains. >> let's talk about hp here, jeff. a sharp decline in the stock. one of the reasons that the dow industrial is really -- can't break out here in any way. you have a fair amount of winners there. hewlett pa
the it should go down game. >> what if you're making a call on the real economy, x market. what would you be saying about the u.s. fortunes into q4? >> i still await a negative retail story that i don't have. china -- can china remain bad forever? that's a difficult question to see how long it can remain bad. >> good point. stuff on housing is good. the lead story in "the journal" today, trade slowing. slowing pmis in japan, china, europe -- >> how is this news? what news was there in that story about trade is slow? were they really that devoid of anything new? that's like, d.a. probes rackets. come on! >> meanwhile, busy week for new companies. one of the busiest weeks for ipos since july. and i think september, i just saw these numbers, the best september since '99. eight deals, $5.5 billion, best actual month since may. >> david bust ser coming back. my daughter was able to beat -- there's a claw that comes down -- my daughter got five straight. i'm glad dave & buster is coming back. >> anything worth anything? >> not more than two cents. >> and it costs 50 cents to play? >> i've dropp
to be the worst month of the year historically. we know the global economy is weakening. everybody came on our air saying hey. short the global economy. this did not turn out to be such a good theory did it? right now, 2.9% for one of the best months of the year. not the best month but among the better months of the year. what were the two biggest gains we had this month? the two biggest days? september 6th? that was the day draghi announced the bond buying program. biggest gain. second biggest gain september 13th the day of the fomc meeting. what does this tell us? it tells us what matters in the world is central bank intervention and also what's going on in europe. what was the worst day this year? it was tuesday, the day we saw the riots in madrid because that's the day everybody said uh-oh. this whole deal with spain and this careful choreography moving toward help from the eu could fall apart. turns out maybe it's holding together a little better than anticipated. my point is what moves the world is central bank intervention and what's going on in europe. to play against that is very, very da
had expected. that suggests the economy may not be so hot, right? >> set the stage. we just downgrade the second quarter. we went from 1.7 to 1.3. we talked about that yesterday. >> this i consistent with that. >> exactly. we thought third quarter might have a two handle on it. we're taking that two handle off. before i came on goldman sachs has a report saying they're looking at 1.9. i see some over 1.8, 1.7. slow mediocre growth continues. i think the key being, can we resolve the issues that have hung over the american economy from spain? >> is madrid more important than chicago? >> at least it is today. we wanted to see what the needs would be for the spanish banks. the numbers that they put out today after this exhaustive examination. >> do you breath numbers? >> the market believes them now. they came about in line with expectations. the number could change depending on what happens with the spanish economy and if real estate prices fall even further. you think more of this like a tradeoff. if the capital requirements had been even bigger it would have meant they were going to c
in the market don't seem to reflect the declines in the economy. there's sort of a disconnect. i think you agree with that, don't you? >> i absolutely agree with you, bill. i think all of september the market has been moved, not by what's going on here in the united states, but what's been going on in europe, which says to me two things. one, any bad news out of europe is going to send the market down. two, eventually people are going to have to pay attention to what's going on in the united states. i'm expecting we're heading into earnings season, i'm expecting anemic growth, and eventually that's going to have to play into the situation here. i mean, i know you don't fight the fed, but eventually we have to come back to what's going on in terms of fundamentals and stop focusing on monetary policy. >> what do you think? are we going to focus on fundamentals? if you are, kurt, would you be a seller of this market? >> we are focused in on fundamentals. i think this has been a tug of war between the reflationists and some of the risk that's been perceived in the market. we're not investing in gdp.
in the american economy. if we did get a decision on the grand bargain that the ten year time frame of how we would manage the cuts and spending and tax increases and investments, because we need to do all three. we need the tax, we need to cut and invest in the sources of our strength. i think that would just have a huge -- americans feel like children are permanently divorcing parents, and i think it is like a poll on the country in a lot of ways. so second, if we had a grand bargain on energy, how to exploit the bounty of natural gas in particular in the environmentally safe and sustainable way on the national basis i think those two things together would have a huge impact. so the question is how close are we to that? and i was saying about the middle east but it may apply to american politics is all important politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left
of president obama and the economy. if you can't get it right, it's time to get out. >> reporter: the republican ticket is hoping their bus tour will make up lost ground in ohio as polls hoe mitt romney trailing president obama in this pivotal swing state. in dayton tuesday romney hammered mr. obama on tacks. >> i admit this one thing he did not do in his first four years, he has said he is going to do in the next four years which is to raise taxes, and is there anybody that thinks that raising taxes will help grow the economy? >> reporter: an attack over tacks is actually a change for romney, who is often accused the president of raising taxes in his first term. romney is looking to jump-start his campaign with a good performance in the first debate one week from today. the man who plays mr. obama in romney's mock debate sessions, though, tried to lower expectations playing up the president's experience. >> he has been through a lot of those one-on-one debates with a republican. mitt has not, and you think about it, he hasn't had a real debate in ten years because these republic
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)